Bookmarks

Yahoo Gmail Google Facebook Delicious Twitter Reddit Stumpleupon Myspace Digg

Search queries

MUSCLE WOMAN MAYHEM – ‘BEATS HUBBY, BITES COP, MUSCLE NICOLE BASS BEAT AND KILL, stephen a smith radio theme song, golf club grace before meals, golf graces before meals, seymore butts ass hunt tylene buck, katharine mcphee ugly vagina, dinner grace at golf club, grace for golf club dinner, stephen a smith intro song

Links

XODOX
Impressum

#1: French Reject Capitalism

Posted on 2005-05-30 10:31:57 by Freedom Fries

French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
Writer


PARIS - In a stunning rejection of the European Union's latest ambitious
move to unite its 25 nations, French voters shot down the bloc's first
constitution, dealing a potentially fatal blow to the charter and
humiliating President Jacques Chirac.

Sunday's referendum in France, a cradle of continental unity for more than
half a century and the country where much of the constitution was
painstakingly written, threatened to set back plans for broader European
integration by years.

About 55 percent of voters opposed the treaty - the first rejection in
Europe. France's repudiation came ahead of Wednesday's referendum in the
Netherlands, where polls show even more resistance to the constitution, and
had EU leaders scrambling to do damage control.

"The result raises profound questions for all of us about the future
direction of Europe," British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said.

But the European Union's industry commissioner, Guenther Verheugen, said the
vote was not a catastrophe and that the situation should not be
over-dramatized. European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso,
while conceding the outcome was a "serious problem," insisted: "We cannot
say that the treaty is dead."

Chirac had waged an all-out campaign to persuade nearly 42 million sharply
divided voters to approve the charter. But the electorate was in a
rebellious mood, with unemployment running at 10 percent and unease about
the direction Europe is taking.

Turnout was close to 70 percent - testifying to the passions that the treaty
and the debate surrounding it aroused.

Chirac argued that the constitution would streamline EU decision-making and
make the bloc more accessible to its 450 million citizens. But opponents
feared it would strip France of its sovereignty and generous social system
and trigger an influx of cheap labor.

They feared the treaty would open the EU to unfettered free-market
capitalism, trampling on workers rights.

Treaty opponents chanting "We won!" gathered at Paris' Place de la Bastille,
a symbol of rebellion where angry crowds in 1789 stormed the Bastille prison
and sparked the French Revolution. Cars blared their horns and "no"
campaigners thrust their arms into the air.

"This is a great victory," said Fabrice Savel, 38, from the working-class
suburb of Aubervilliers, distributing posters that read: "No to a
free-market Europe."

Ahmed Meguili, a militant leftist, noted the significance of the Bastille
for the "no" camp's celebrations.

"In 1789, the revolutionaries freed the prisoners and frightened the king,"
he said. "This is the same thing. This is yet another divorce between the
leaders and the people."

All 25 EU members must ratify the text for it to take effect as planned by
Nov. 1, 2006. Nine already have done so: Austria, Hungary, Italy, Germany,
Greece, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.

The constitution's main architect, former French President Valery Giscard
d'Estaing, said countries that reject the treaty will be asked to vote
again.

Chirac said the process of ratifying the treaty would continue in other EU
countries.

"It is your sovereign decision, and I take note," Chirac said. "Make no
mistake, France's decision inevitably creates a difficult context for the
defense of our interests in Europe."

But Philippe de Villiers, a leading opponent, declared the treaty dead.

"There is no more constitution," he said. "It is necessary to reconstruct
Europe on other foundations that don't currently exist."

De Villiers called on Chirac to resign - something the French leader had
said he would not do - and called for parliament to be dissolved.

Jean-Marie Le Pen, the extreme-right leader who campaigned vigorously
against the constitution, also called for Chirac's resignation. Chirac
"wanted to gamble ... and he has lost," Le Pen said.

Chirac and other European leaders had said there was no fallback plan in the
event of a French rejection. But voters did not believe that. Many,
especially on the left, hoped their "no" vote would force the EU back to the
drawing board and improve the 448-clause document.

Nicolas Sarkozy, the head of Chirac's ruling Union for a Popular Movement
and a leading campaigner for the "yes" camp, called Sunday's defeat "a major
political event."

Looking ahead to France's next general elections in 2007, Sarkozy said: "We
must decide on an innovative, courageous and ambitious plan of action."

Chirac's popularity ratings have plummeted in recent weeks, and in his
television address, the president said he would announce "my decisions
concerning the government and its priorities" in coming days. There was
widespread speculation that he would dump unpopular Prime Minister
Jean-Pierre Raffarin.

Report this message

#2: Re: French Reject Capitalism

Posted on 2005-05-30 11:24:36 by Douglas

well duh.. ofcourse they rejected it...


&quot;Freedom Fries&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:RedumblicansShouldBe&#64;gaschambers.com" target="_blank">RedumblicansShouldBe&#64;gaschambers.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:429ad30b$<a href="mailto:1_1&#64;x-privat.org..." target="_blank">1_1&#64;x-privat.org...</a>
&gt; French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
&gt; Writer
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; PARIS - In a stunning rejection of the European Union's latest
&gt; ambitious
&gt; move to unite its 25 nations, French voters shot down the bloc's first
&gt; constitution, dealing a potentially fatal blow to the charter and
&gt; humiliating President Jacques Chirac.
&gt;
&gt; Sunday's referendum in France, a cradle of continental unity for more than
&gt; half a century and the country where much of the constitution was
&gt; painstakingly written, threatened to set back plans for broader European
&gt; integration by years.
&gt;
&gt; About 55 percent of voters opposed the treaty - the first rejection in
&gt; Europe. France's repudiation came ahead of Wednesday's referendum in the
&gt; Netherlands, where polls show even more resistance to the constitution,
&gt; and
&gt; had EU leaders scrambling to do damage control.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;The result raises profound questions for all of us about the future
&gt; direction of Europe,&quot; British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said.
&gt;
&gt; But the European Union's industry commissioner, Guenther Verheugen, said
&gt; the
&gt; vote was not a catastrophe and that the situation should not be
&gt; over-dramatized. European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso,
&gt; while conceding the outcome was a &quot;serious problem,&quot; insisted: &quot;We cannot
&gt; say that the treaty is dead.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Chirac had waged an all-out campaign to persuade nearly 42 million sharply
&gt; divided voters to approve the charter. But the electorate was in a
&gt; rebellious mood, with unemployment running at 10 percent and unease about
&gt; the direction Europe is taking.
&gt;
&gt; Turnout was close to 70 percent - testifying to the passions that the
&gt; treaty
&gt; and the debate surrounding it aroused.
&gt;
&gt; Chirac argued that the constitution would streamline EU decision-making
&gt; and
&gt; make the bloc more accessible to its 450 million citizens. But opponents
&gt; feared it would strip France of its sovereignty and generous social system
&gt; and trigger an influx of cheap labor.
&gt;
&gt; They feared the treaty would open the EU to unfettered free-market
&gt; capitalism, trampling on workers rights.
&gt;
&gt; Treaty opponents chanting &quot;We won!&quot; gathered at Paris' Place de la
&gt; Bastille,
&gt; a symbol of rebellion where angry crowds in 1789 stormed the Bastille
&gt; prison
&gt; and sparked the French Revolution. Cars blared their horns and &quot;no&quot;
&gt; campaigners thrust their arms into the air.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;This is a great victory,&quot; said Fabrice Savel, 38, from the working-class
&gt; suburb of Aubervilliers, distributing posters that read: &quot;No to a
&gt; free-market Europe.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Ahmed Meguili, a militant leftist, noted the significance of the Bastille
&gt; for the &quot;no&quot; camp's celebrations.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;In 1789, the revolutionaries freed the prisoners and frightened the
&gt; king,&quot;
&gt; he said. &quot;This is the same thing. This is yet another divorce between the
&gt; leaders and the people.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; All 25 EU members must ratify the text for it to take effect as planned by
&gt; Nov. 1, 2006. Nine already have done so: Austria, Hungary, Italy, Germany,
&gt; Greece, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.
&gt;
&gt; The constitution's main architect, former French President Valery Giscard
&gt; d'Estaing, said countries that reject the treaty will be asked to vote
&gt; again.
&gt;
&gt; Chirac said the process of ratifying the treaty would continue in other EU
&gt; countries.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;It is your sovereign decision, and I take note,&quot; Chirac said. &quot;Make no
&gt; mistake, France's decision inevitably creates a difficult context for the
&gt; defense of our interests in Europe.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; But Philippe de Villiers, a leading opponent, declared the treaty dead.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;There is no more constitution,&quot; he said. &quot;It is necessary to reconstruct
&gt; Europe on other foundations that don't currently exist.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; De Villiers called on Chirac to resign - something the French leader had
&gt; said he would not do - and called for parliament to be dissolved.
&gt;
&gt; Jean-Marie Le Pen, the extreme-right leader who campaigned vigorously
&gt; against the constitution, also called for Chirac's resignation. Chirac
&gt; &quot;wanted to gamble ... and he has lost,&quot; Le Pen said.
&gt;
&gt; Chirac and other European leaders had said there was no fallback plan in
&gt; the
&gt; event of a French rejection. But voters did not believe that. Many,
&gt; especially on the left, hoped their &quot;no&quot; vote would force the EU back to
&gt; the
&gt; drawing board and improve the 448-clause document.
&gt;
&gt; Nicolas Sarkozy, the head of Chirac's ruling Union for a Popular Movement
&gt; and a leading campaigner for the &quot;yes&quot; camp, called Sunday's defeat &quot;a
&gt; major
&gt; political event.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Looking ahead to France's next general elections in 2007, Sarkozy said:
&gt; &quot;We
&gt; must decide on an innovative, courageous and ambitious plan of action.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Chirac's popularity ratings have plummeted in recent weeks, and in his
&gt; television address, the president said he would announce &quot;my decisions
&gt; concerning the government and its priorities&quot; in coming days. There was
&gt; widespread speculation that he would dump unpopular Prime Minister
&gt; Jean-Pierre Raffarin.
&gt;
&gt;

Report this message

#3: Re: French Reject Capitalism

Posted on 2005-05-30 23:13:39 by Dave Zero

Douglas wrote:
&gt; well duh.. ofcourse they rejected it...

And I say good job to them. Europe is a very diverse group of nations
with thousands of years of hatred and memories between members of
opposing nations. They don't need this EU thing in the first place, they
should be who they've historically been and not pretend that they're
like states in the United States.


--
Dave Zero

&quot;And I don't care about making an ass out of myself because most people
already realize I am one.&quot; - Dr. Kary B. Mullis

&quot;I criticize by creation&quot; - Cicero

&quot;I'm not here to make people happy. I prefer to piss people off.&quot; - Liam
Gallagher

Report this message

#4: Re: French Reject Capitalism

Posted on 2005-05-31 00:20:59 by Pope Long Dong II

On Mon, 30 May 2005 04:46:16 -0400, &quot;Freedom Fries&quot;


tRANSLATION...

We must stay zee communist lite

Report this message

#5: French reject globalist world government

Posted on 2005-05-31 01:50:13 by calaf

Freedom Fries wrote:

&gt; French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
&gt; Writer
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; PARIS - In a stunning rejection of the European Union's latest ambitious
&gt; move to unite its 25 nations, French voters shot down the bloc's first
&gt; constitution, dealing a potentially fatal blow to the charter and
&gt; humiliating President Jacques Chirac.
&gt;
&gt; Sunday's referendum in France, a cradle of continental unity for more than
&gt; half a century and the country where much of the constitution was
&gt; painstakingly written, threatened to set back plans for broader European
&gt; integration by years.
&gt;
&gt; About 55 percent of voters opposed the treaty - the first rejection in
&gt; Europe. France's repudiation came ahead of Wednesday's referendum in the
&gt; Netherlands, where polls show even more resistance to the constitution, and
&gt; had EU leaders scrambling to do damage control.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;The result raises profound questions for all of us about the future
&gt; direction of Europe,&quot; British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said.
&gt;
&gt; But the European Union's industry commissioner, Guenther Verheugen, said the
&gt; vote was not a catastrophe and that the situation should not be
&gt; over-dramatized. European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso,
&gt; while conceding the outcome was a &quot;serious problem,&quot; insisted: &quot;We cannot
&gt; say that the treaty is dead.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Chirac had waged an all-out campaign to persuade nearly 42 million sharply
&gt; divided voters to approve the charter. But the electorate was in a
&gt; rebellious mood, with unemployment running at 10 percent and unease about
&gt; the direction Europe is taking.
&gt;
&gt; Turnout was close to 70 percent - testifying to the passions that the treaty
&gt; and the debate surrounding it aroused.
&gt;
&gt; Chirac argued that the constitution would streamline EU decision-making and
&gt; make the bloc more accessible to its 450 million citizens. But opponents
&gt; feared it would strip France of its sovereignty and generous social system
&gt; and trigger an influx of cheap labor.
&gt;
&gt; They feared the treaty would open the EU to unfettered free-market
&gt; capitalism, trampling on workers rights.
&gt;
&gt; Treaty opponents chanting &quot;We won!&quot; gathered at Paris' Place de la Bastille,
&gt; a symbol of rebellion where angry crowds in 1789 stormed the Bastille prison
&gt; and sparked the French Revolution. Cars blared their horns and &quot;no&quot;
&gt; campaigners thrust their arms into the air.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;This is a great victory,&quot; said Fabrice Savel, 38, from the working-class
&gt; suburb of Aubervilliers, distributing posters that read: &quot;No to a
&gt; free-market Europe.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Ahmed Meguili, a militant leftist, noted the significance of the Bastille
&gt; for the &quot;no&quot; camp's celebrations.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;In 1789, the revolutionaries freed the prisoners and frightened the king,&quot;
&gt; he said. &quot;This is the same thing. This is yet another divorce between the
&gt; leaders and the people.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; All 25 EU members must ratify the text for it to take effect as planned by
&gt; Nov. 1, 2006. Nine already have done so: Austria, Hungary, Italy, Germany,
&gt; Greece, Lithuania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.
&gt;
&gt; The constitution's main architect, former French President Valery Giscard
&gt; d'Estaing, said countries that reject the treaty will be asked to vote
&gt; again.
&gt;
&gt; Chirac said the process of ratifying the treaty would continue in other EU
&gt; countries.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;It is your sovereign decision, and I take note,&quot; Chirac said. &quot;Make no
&gt; mistake, France's decision inevitably creates a difficult context for the
&gt; defense of our interests in Europe.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; But Philippe de Villiers, a leading opponent, declared the treaty dead.
&gt;
&gt; &quot;There is no more constitution,&quot; he said. &quot;It is necessary to reconstruct
&gt; Europe on other foundations that don't currently exist.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; De Villiers called on Chirac to resign - something the French leader had
&gt; said he would not do - and called for parliament to be dissolved.
&gt;
&gt; Jean-Marie Le Pen, the extreme-right leader who campaigned vigorously
&gt; against the constitution, also called for Chirac's resignation. Chirac
&gt; &quot;wanted to gamble ... and he has lost,&quot; Le Pen said.
&gt;
&gt; Chirac and other European leaders had said there was no fallback plan in the
&gt; event of a French rejection. But voters did not believe that. Many,
&gt; especially on the left, hoped their &quot;no&quot; vote would force the EU back to the
&gt; drawing board and improve the 448-clause document.
&gt;
&gt; Nicolas Sarkozy, the head of Chirac's ruling Union for a Popular Movement
&gt; and a leading campaigner for the &quot;yes&quot; camp, called Sunday's defeat &quot;a major
&gt; political event.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Looking ahead to France's next general elections in 2007, Sarkozy said: &quot;We
&gt; must decide on an innovative, courageous and ambitious plan of action.&quot;
&gt;
&gt; Chirac's popularity ratings have plummeted in recent weeks, and in his
&gt; television address, the president said he would announce &quot;my decisions
&gt; concerning the government and its priorities&quot; in coming days. There was
&gt; widespread speculation that he would dump unpopular Prime Minister
&gt; Jean-Pierre Raffarin.
&gt;
&gt;

Report this message

#6: Re: French reject globalist world government

Posted on 2005-05-31 02:01:50 by Dave Zero

calaf wrote:
&gt; Freedom Fries wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt; French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated
&gt;&gt; Press Writer

You know, Calaf, if you just quote his entire post and don't say
anything in response, you defeat the entire purpose of me having
killfiled his dumb ass.


--
Dave Zero

&quot;And I don't care about making an ass out of myself because most people
already realize I am one.&quot; - Dr. Kary B. Mullis

&quot;I criticize by creation&quot; - Cicero

&quot;I'm not here to make people happy. I prefer to piss people off.&quot; - Liam
Gallagher

Report this message

#7: Re: French Reject Capitalism

Posted on 2005-05-31 05:22:21 by Rob Browning

On Mon, 30 May 2005 04:46:16 -0400, &quot;Freedom Fries&quot;
&lt;<a href="mailto:RedumblicansShouldBe&#64;gaschambers.com" target="_blank">RedumblicansShouldBe&#64;gaschambers.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt;French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
&gt;Writer

Hey, it's France, what did you expect?

Seriously though, I don't even think most Americans like things as
free-market as what the EU is proposing. The obvious consequences of
this constitution are rampant outsourcing and immigration (kind of
like what we're dealing with now, but much worse). It also damages
sovereignty, which is obviously something that Americans are against
(at least when it comes to their own country).

Nice to see you do a right-wing troll for once, though.

Rob
<a href="mailto:ploovTeHSPaeMBLoKuR&#64;charter.net" target="_blank">ploovTeHSPaeMBLoKuR&#64;charter.net</a>

--

Owner of 2501 Netstalker Points awarded by Corwin of Amber, mainly
because Atma's just too damn attractive to get away from.

Gave 7499 Netstalker Points to Cypher because there's no such thing as
a good day on AGFF without JT bashing!

Owner of David Watson, rec.arts.anime.misc

&quot;He looks like he'd get cut out of a Final Fantasy game for being 'too
gay.' That is like getting booed off the stage at Amateur Night at
the Apollo for being 'too black.'&quot;
--Dr. David Thorpe, Something Awful Fashion SWAT &quot;Ganguro Madness&quot;

Report this message

#8: Re: French Reject Capitalism

Posted on 2005-06-02 00:04:58 by JustForFun

On Mon, 30 May 2005 23:22:21 -0400, Rob Browning
&lt;<a href="mailto:pluvius3&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">pluvius3&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt;On Mon, 30 May 2005 04:46:16 -0400, &quot;Freedom Fries&quot;
&gt;&lt;<a href="mailto:RedumblicansShouldBe&#64;gaschambers.com" target="_blank">RedumblicansShouldBe&#64;gaschambers.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt;French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
&gt;&gt;Writer
&gt;
&gt;Hey, it's France, what did you expect?
&gt;
&gt;Seriously though, I don't even think most Americans like things as
&gt;free-market as what the EU is proposing. The obvious consequences of
&gt;this constitution are rampant outsourcing and immigration (kind of
&gt;like what we're dealing with now, but much worse).

Cool. So all the illegals from Mexico will go there, instead? I like
it already ;-)

&gt; It also damages
&gt;sovereignty, which is obviously something that Americans are against
&gt;(at least when it comes to their own country).

This, of course, is why the whole EU thing should never happen in the
first place.

Europe can't agree on much of anything. Whatever makes them think they
could feasibly live under a single constitution is beyond me. Well,
really it isn't. They realize it's the only way any of them would be
come a player as influential as the U.S. on the world stage. I guess
it just depends on how many of those countries are willing to sell out
to reach that power level.

&gt;Nice to see you do a right-wing troll for once, though.
&gt;
&gt;Rob
&gt;<a href="mailto:ploovTeHSPaeMBLoKuR&#64;charter.net" target="_blank">ploovTeHSPaeMBLoKuR&#64;charter.net</a>

Report this message