Bookmarks

Yahoo Gmail Google Facebook Delicious Twitter Reddit Stumpleupon Myspace Digg

Search queries

golf club grace before meals, golf graces before meals, seymore butts ass hunt tylene buck, katharine mcphee ugly vagina, dinner grace at golf club, grace for golf club dinner, stephen a smith intro song, tylene buck interview, Tina fey anal, hqpron

Links

XODOX
Impressum

#1: Track layout dimensions

Posted on 2006-07-14 18:22:03 by Harald

Hi Runners,

I'm trying to find out where to run on a 400 meter track if I want to run
440 yards. I seem to remember that running on the inside of lane 2 is about
1/4 mile. Is this correct? I'd also like to know what all those marks on a
track mean. Can someone please direct me to a website that shows the
standard layout of a 400 meter track? I've searched the net and can't find
a good diagram.

Thanks,
Harald

Report this message

#2: Re: Track layout dimensions

Posted on 2006-07-14 19:09:21 by Piedmont Donald

"Harald" wrote:

> I'm trying to find out where to run on a 400 meter track if I want to
run
> 440 yards. I seem to remember that running on the inside of lane 2 is
about
> 1/4 mile. Is this correct? I'd also like to know what all those
marks on a
> track mean. Can someone please direct me to a website that shows the
> standard layout of a 400 meter track? I've searched the net and can't
find
> a good diagram.

Try:

<a href="http://www.philsport.com/narf/atrack.htm" target="_blank">http://www.philsport.com/narf/atrack.htm</a>

Piedmont Donald

Report this message

#3: Re: Track layout dimensions

Posted on 2006-07-14 19:20:20 by steve common

&quot;Harald&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:haraldNOSPAMstenger&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">haraldNOSPAMstenger&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt;I've searched the net and can't find
&gt;a good diagram.

Some stuff here
<a href="http://www.ausport.gov.au/fulltext/1998/wa/dimplay/athtrack.pdf" target="_blank"> http://www.ausport.gov.au/fulltext/1998/wa/dimplay/athtrack. pdf</a>

Report this message

#4: Re: Track layout dimensions

Posted on 2006-07-14 21:06:17 by Harald

Thanks for the link. I did a little playing with the program to try and
figure out where to run on a 400 meter track in order to run 1/4 mile. If I
tell the calculator that the lane width is 350mm, then running in &quot;lane 2&quot;
of this imaginary track will give you 1/4 mile per lap. Because each lane
distance is measured 200mm out from the line, this would add up to 550mm
from the inside edge of lane 1 that you would need to run in order to make a
400 meter track into a 1/4 mile track.


&quot;Piedmont Donald&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:sorry_invalid&#64;too_much_spam.com" target="_blank">sorry_invalid&#64;too_much_spam.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:LcQtg.3170$<a href="mailto:Bx.2007&#64;bignews5.bellsouth.net..." target="_blank">Bx.2007&#64;bignews5.bellsouth.net...</a>
&gt;
&gt; &quot;Harald&quot; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt; I'm trying to find out where to run on a 400 meter track if I want to
&gt; run
&gt;&gt; 440 yards. I seem to remember that running on the inside of lane 2 is
&gt; about
&gt;&gt; 1/4 mile. Is this correct? I'd also like to know what all those
&gt; marks on a
&gt;&gt; track mean. Can someone please direct me to a website that shows the
&gt;&gt; standard layout of a 400 meter track? I've searched the net and can't
&gt; find
&gt;&gt; a good diagram.
&gt;
&gt; Try:
&gt;
&gt; <a href="http://www.philsport.com/narf/atrack.htm" target="_blank">http://www.philsport.com/narf/atrack.htm</a>
&gt;
&gt; Piedmont Donald
&gt;
&gt;

Report this message

#5: Re: Track layout dimensions

Posted on 2006-07-14 23:14:22 by Kaz Kylheku

Harald wrote:
&gt; Hi Runners,
&gt;
&gt; I'm trying to find out where to run on a 400 meter track if I want to run
&gt; 440 yards.

The abstract measure line on a 400 meter track is 20 cm from the inside
edge. 30 cm if there is a raised curb. This measure line is what is 400
meters long.

Additional distance is added using the familiar 2 * pi * r formula.
Since the ovals are circular, whatever displacement R you add to the
radius around the oval contributes 2 * pi * R to the distance around
the track. If you run 10 cm out, you add about 63 cm to the length
(multiply by 3.14 * 2 = 6.28 then round off).

&gt; I seem to remember that running on the inside of lane 2 is about
&gt; 1/4 mile. Is this correct?

You need about 402.25 meters to make 1/4 mile. So in other words 2.25
meters longer around the track. Divide that by 6.28 and it tells you
how many meters out you should be from the measure line. The answer is
0.358 or about 36 cm.

Factoring in the displacement of the measure line, this means 56 cm
from the inside if there is no curb, 66 if there is a curb.

Report this message

#6: Re: Track layout dimensions

Posted on 2006-07-17 01:29:46 by Donovan Rebbechi

On 2006-07-14, Harald &lt;<a href="mailto:haraldNOSPAMstenger&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">haraldNOSPAMstenger&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt; Hi Runners,
&gt;
&gt; I'm trying to find out where to run on a 400 meter track if I want to run
&gt; 440 yards. I seem to remember that running on the inside of lane 2 is about
&gt; 1/4 mile. Is this correct? I'd also like to know what all those marks on a
&gt; track mean. Can someone please direct me to a website that shows the
&gt; standard layout of a 400 meter track? I've searched the net and can't find
&gt; a good diagram.

You've already received some good answers -- you can do it but it's impractical,
because without a marked line, there's nothing to stop you cutting the course.
If you run in such a way that you're *sure* you didn't cut the course, then you are
probably running too far (not much too far, but if you care about the difference
between 1/4 mile and 400m, exactness counts for something).

Some more practical alternatives are

(1) if you're doing a 1 mile time trial or similar, where you really can't use the
metric distance, then simply bring a tape measure, measure the starting point
9.344m back, and go from there. You could mark off the intermediate points by
subdividing that distance up into 4 if you want to get splits, or if you want to
run various distance intervals. This is how they do track meets on metric
tracks.

(2) another alternative if you're doing 400m reps or similar is to simply
convert your times after the fact (or your goal times before-the-fact!). Pace
curve doesn't change significantly, so you linearly extrapolation is very
accurate. This is a good idea, because usually we care more about getting
*pace estimation* exact, the distance itself isn't as critical.

So for example, I do 1600m &quot;mile&quot; reps, which are strictly speaking about 2-2
1/4 seconds short. So I need to hit 5:57 for a 6:00 pace. The fact that my reps
are &quot;only&quot; 1600m instead of 1609.344m doesn't worry me, as long as I'm really
running them at 6:00 per mile (not 6:03 per mile).

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi
<a href="http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/" target="_blank">http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/</a>

Report this message